Lydia, oh, Lydia, oh, have you heard Lydia…

Guy With Typewriter
Gorman Bechard

“Hers is a voice that can soar, that can break, that can swagger and scream, that can whisper and seduce, that can smirk and laugh out loud. She is the china cup from which Billie Holiday would want to drink.”

“Hers is a voice that can soar, that can break, that can swagger and scream, that can whisper and seduce, that can smirk and laugh out loud. She is the china cup from which Billie Holiday would want to drink.”

“the unreleased song she closed the show with, a song dedicated to her friend who’d passed, and called “High Life.” She sang it alone. It was sad, it was beautiful, it made me smile. And I couldn’t help but think that wherever her friend is now, he quickly became the envy of those around him. Perhaps even god, listening for those few minutes thinking that damn when he got it right, he really got it right. And no, nothing’s changed in that respect. I still don’t believe in god. But after last night I certainly, wholehearted, believe in Lydia Loveless.”

Read the rest of this review at: Guy With Typewriter

5 Bands You Need to Hear: June

by Sarah Smith


Lydia Loveless

It’s surely only a matter of time before Lydia Loveless starts making her mark in Australia. A darling of US indie music media, Loveless writes country songs infused with a snarling punk sensibility that’s been described as “Hank Williams crossed with Kathleen Hanna”. At 23 years of age, the Ohio-bred singer has already released three albums, but it’s on her most recent – 2014’s Somewhere Else – that she has really hit her stride. Loveless’ story-telling is searingly honest and in the tradition of great country music, often down-right depressing. On her latest record she sings about substance abuse, fighting with ex-boyfriends, and on album-standout ‘Head’ manages to turn a song about oral sex into a lonely lovers lament. Heavy.

Read the rest here: FasterLouder.com

 

Somewhere Messed Up: Lydia Loveless & the Old 97s

District Consonance
musings about music in the district of columbia

…Loveless’s set had plenty of swagger and twang — punk-inflected and country-infused, fortified with a few swigs of Jim Beam. She doesn’t cram her experiences of loss and love into a country princess package. There are plenty of suppliers of anodyne countrified pop, and Lydia Loveless ain’t one of ‘em. Her album, Somewhere Else, is the proof.

Over the course of three studio albums, Loveless’s music has evolved from a more classic country aesthetic with banjos, fiddles, and pedal steel, to grittier, more muscular offerings fleshed out with electric guitar and keyboard. From “Really Want To See You” and “Head” to “Verlaine Shot Rimbaud,” Loveless covers the spectrum, cussing and spitting out sexual innuendo at times, and at other times, talking about love with reference to French poets and lovers Paul Verlaine and Arthur Rimbaud, who were equal parts brilliant and volatile (spoiler alert: Verlaine really did shoot Rimbaud).

It’s as if Loveless spent her tender years reading highbrow literature and penning lyrics between sets, whiskey shots, and parking lot brawls at bars on the wrong side of town. This is good stuff — give her a listen and buy her music…

Read the rest of this review @ DistrictConsonance.com